Lecture: Time for Change

The National Coordinator for Brahma Kumaris services in Suriname, sister Loes Bemmel, lectures to different groups on spiritual topics, and also facilitates workshops on values in healthcare, in which she brings together her experiences in both medicine and spirituality. Thursday June 6th she will give a free lecture at the University of Aruba on the topic: Changes.

One of the biggest challenges the world is facing nowadays is fast changes on all areas. Communication facilities, climate, leaders and leadership approaches, political systems and societies change…what not? But despite of all the outer changes of which many may seem to bring benefit to the world, our level of security diminishes day by day.

In fact it’s all about how we deal with it… Are we ready for inner change?

Facilitator
Sister Loes Bemmel hails from Suriname. She is a medical doctor, who from a young age, had the ambition to study psychology and behavioral science. As a qualified doctor, her first practice was in Public Health. She later went on to specialize in Pediatrics. She retired in 2013 after serving the medical profession as pediatrician for over 21 years.

She joined the Brahma Kumaris in Suriname in 1993 and went on a spiritual journey. She is now the National Coordinator for Brahma Kumaris services in Suriname. Apart from her administrative role, she lectures to different groups on spiritual topics, and also facilitates workshops on values in healthcare, in which she brings together her experiences in both medicine and spirituality

Lecture June 6th

Garden 2, University of Aruba
J.E. Irausquinplein 4
5.30 pm – 7 pm
Admission is free of charge

More information: Facebook University of Aruba

The Brahma Kumaris are a Hindu spiritual movement that originated in Hyderabad, Sindh, during the 1930s. The Brahma Kumaris (Sanskrit: ब्रह्माकुमारी, “People of Brahma”) movement was founded by Lekhraj Kripalani. The organization is affiliated with the United Nations and is known for the prominent role that women play in the movement.

It teaches a form of meditation that focuses on identity as souls, as opposed to bodies. They believe that all souls are intrinsically good and that God is the source of all goodness. They teach to transcend labels associated with the body, such as race, nationality, religion, and gender, and it aspires to establish a global culture based on what it calls “soul-consciousness”.

In 2008, the movement claimed to have more than 825,000 regular students, with over 8,500 centers in 100 countries. Source: Wikipedia.