First positive Monkeypox case in Aruba

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Aruba has its first confirmed case of Monkeypox. The case concerns a resident with no recent travel history. The Department of Public Health concluded that this infection took place in Aruba. There is also a suspicious case under investigation.

Monkeypox virus spreads from person to person through direct contact with the infected person. It can happen by:

Direct contact with respiratory secretions (droplets) when the infected person coughs or sneezes;

direct contact with the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids of the blisters (skin to skin or touching infected clothes). If you notice blisters on different body parts, contact your family physician to get tested and take the necessary precautions.

Symptoms of Monkeypox typically include:

Fever;

Headache;

Tiredness;

Muscle aches;

Swollen lymph nodes.

Vaccines

DVG will soon receive a limited number of Monkey pox vaccines from the Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu – RIVM of the Netherlands. (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment).

The vaccines will be available for the high-risk groups according to the instructions and policy of the Netherlands. The health providers and specialists will call the risk group members to receive the vaccine if they so desire. DVG will work with some organizations to jointly reach the high-risk groups.

For more information follow the DVG on Facebook Directie Volksgezondheid DVG Aruba, or visit www.dvg.aw, call 5224200 or send email to servicio@dvg.aw.